Are Educational Attainment Trends in The Southeast Unique?

My new blog post at the FRB Atlanta’s Partners Update explores this question. Overall, cities have higher relative performance than their suburbs, compared to large metros across the country, but lower levels of overall attainment. 

The post includes an interactive map and graphs! Check it out, link is below. 

https://www.frbatlanta.org/commdev/publications/partnersupdate/2015/03/workforce-development/city-suburban-educational-attainment-trends-in-southeast-united-states

My Next Installment in the Across Generations: Quality of Life series on PlannersWeb.com

Check out my latest installment, “Planning Commissioners can Promote Quality of Life” in the Across Generations: Young and Old series at PlannersWeb.com.  This month Jennifer Wallace-Brodeur and I discuss quality of life planning for young adults and seniors.  Other columns in the series by Jennifer and I cover housing and employment (and an introduction to the series).

The Populist Agenda: Jobs and Inequality

Paul Krugman links jobs and inequality in yesterday’s New York Times column.  He notes that job instability has led to deepening inequality because workers do not feel confident to search for higher paying employment.  At the same time he points to the work of Steven Fazzari that shows that inequality was a contributor to the economic collapse in 2007.  Fazzari shows that simple job creation — especially at the bottom of the income distribution — led to significant increases in debt and the ultimate crash.

The relationship between inequality and jobs is “bi-directional” where changes in one influence the other and likely create a reinforcing feedback.  Wages cannot be so unequal that lower income workers have to borrow to get by — when households reach their borrowing maximum, recessions happen (part of Fazzari’s point).  We need a job creation system to get people back to work as well as an inequality strategy that helps workers benefit from economic growth.

Getting people back to work isn’t enough, nor is simply solving inequality.  Jobs and inequality are hand in glove.  The goal, as daunting as it may sound, is to “grow the pie” to solve unemployment and inequality, not just “re-slice the pie” (borrow the analogy from Chris Benner and Manuel Pastor’s Just Growth).

Major League Winners and Major League Losers

With several sports leagues in full swing or in the playoffs, this seems like a good time of year to highlight recent work on using sports as an economic development tool.  Mark Rosentraub wrote both Major League Losers in 1999 which highlighted failed sports-based economic development.  He followed the work up in 2009 with Major League Winners, which found that with careful planning and execution, sports-based economic development had worked in some more recent cases.

For another view, Public Dollars, Private Stadiums by Kevin Delaney and Rick Eckstein provides an account of the process through which sports teams received public subsidies.

Finally, Sports, Jobs, and Taxes edited by Roger Noll and Andrew Zimbalist is a collection of essays that explore the economics and economic development potential of sports and stadia.